Journal article

The Association of Telomere Length with Colorectal Cancer Differs by the Age of Cancer Onset

Lisa A Boardman, Kristin Litzelman, Songwon Seo, Ruth A Johnson, Russell J Vanderboom, Grace W Kimmel, Julie M Cunningham, Ronald E Gangnon, Corinne D Engelman, Douglas L Riegert-Johnson, John Potter, Robert Haile, Daniel Buchanan, Mark A Jenkins, David N Rider, Stephen N Thibodeau, Gloria M Petersen, Halcyon G Skinner

CLINICAL AND TRANSLATIONAL GASTROENTEROLOGY | NATURE PUBLISHING GROUP | Published : 2014

Abstract

OBJECTIVES: Telomeres are nucleoprotein structures that cap the end of chromosomes and shorten with sequential cell divisions in normal aging. Short telomeres are also implicated in the incidence of many cancers, but the evidence is not conclusive for colorectal cancer (CRC). Therefore, the aim of this study was to assess the association of CRC and telomere length. METHODS: In this case-control study, we measured relative telomere length from peripheral blood leukocytes (PBLs) DNA with quantitative PCR in 598 CRC patients and 2,212 healthy controls. RESULTS: Multivariate analysis indicated that telomere length was associated with risk for CRC, and this association varied in an age-related ma..

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Grants

Awarded by (Mayo Clinic SPORE in Pancreatic Cancer) through the National Cancer Institute (NCI)


Awarded by (Mayo Clinic Center for Cell Signaling in Gastroenterology) through the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK)


Awarded by National Institutes of Health under RFA


Awarded by Australasian Colorectal Cancer Family Registry


Awarded by Familial Colorectal Neoplasia Collaborative Group (USC)


Awarded by Mayo Clinic Cooperative Family Registry for Colon Cancer Studies


Awarded by Ontario Registry for Studies of Familial Colorectal Cancer


Awarded by Seattle Colorectal Cancer Family Registry


Awarded by University of Hawaii Colorectal Cancer Family Registry


Awarded by NATIONAL CANCER INSTITUTE


Awarded by NATIONAL HEART, LUNG, AND BLOOD INSTITUTE


Awarded by NATIONAL INSTITUTE OF DIABETES AND DIGESTIVE AND KIDNEY DISEASES


Funding Acknowledgements

This work was supported by RO-1 CA132718 and P50 CA102701 (Mayo Clinic SPORE in Pancreatic Cancer) through the National Cancer Institute (NCI); P30 DK084567 (Mayo Clinic Center for Cell Signaling in Gastroenterology) through the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK); the Lustgarten Foundation for Pancreatic Cancer Research; the Mayo Clinic Center for Individualized Medicine; National Institutes of Health under RFA # CA-96-011 and through cooperative agreements with the Australasian Colorectal Cancer Family Registry (U01 CA097735); Familial Colorectal Neoplasia Collaborative Group (U01 CA074799) (USC); Mayo Clinic Cooperative Family Registry for Colon Cancer Studies (U01 CA074800); Ontario Registry for Studies of Familial Colorectal Cancer (U01 CA074783); Seattle Colorectal Cancer Family Registry (U01 CA074794); University of Hawaii Colorectal Cancer Family Registry (U01 CA074806).