Journal article

In vivo tau imaging: Obstacles and progress

Victor L Villemagne, Nobuyuki Okamura

Alzheimer's & Dementia | ELSEVIER SCIENCE INC | Published : 2014

Abstract

The military conflicts of the last decade have highlighted the growing problem of traumatic brain injury in combatants returning from the battlefield. The considerable evidence pointing at the accumulation of tau aggregates and its recognition as a risk factor in neurodegenerative conditions such as Alzheimer's disease have led to a major effort to develop selective tau ligands that would allow research into the physiopathologic underpinnings of traumatic brain injury and chronic traumatic encephalopathy in military personnel and the civilian population. These tracers will allow new insights into tau pathology in the human brain, facilitating research into causes, diagnosis, and treatment of..

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University of Melbourne Researchers

Grants

Awarded by Alzheimer Drug Discovery Foundation Research Grant


Awarded by National Health and Medical Research Council of Australia Project Grant


Awarded by National Health and Medical Research Council of Australia Research Fellowship


Awarded by Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science, and Technology of Japan


Funding Acknowledgements

This study was supported in part by Alzheimer Drug Discovery Foundation Research Grant (20101208 AFTD), National Health and Medical Research Council of Australia Project Grant 1044361, National Health and Medical Research Council of Australia Research Fellowship 1046471, and the Grant-in-Aid for Scientific Research on Priority Areas "Integrative Brain Research" from the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science, and Technology of Japan (20019006). The funding sources had no input into the design of this study, the analysis of data, or writing of the manuscript.