Journal article

Evaluation of the remote-sensing-based DIFFUSE model for estimating photosynthesis of vegetation

RJ Donohue, IH Hume, ML Roderick, TR McVicar, J Beringer, Lb Hutley, JC Gallant, JM Austin, E van Gorsel, JR Cleverly, WS Meyer, SK Arndt

REMOTE SENSING OF ENVIRONMENT | ELSEVIER SCIENCE INC | Published : 2014

Abstract

Vegetation captures carbon from the atmosphere through photosynthesis, the rate of which varies across space, through time and is determined by both physical and biological factors. Methods for estimating photosynthesis (A) vary in their complexity and in which driving processes they capture. Whilst the effect of diffuse shortwave irradiance on A is well understood, few models have explicitly incorporated the diffuse effect into estimates of A. Here we present the DIFFUSE model, a simple, generic, diffuse-light-based method for estimating A at the monthly time scale. This model is based on the assumption that, at the monthly time scale, the majority of variability in A can be explained by th..

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University of Melbourne Researchers

Grants

Awarded by Australian Research Council


Funding Acknowledgements

This research has been supported by CSIRO's Sustainable Agriculture Flagship and Water for a Healthy Country Flagship. R.J.D., J.C.G. and J.M.A. acknowledge the support of the Terrestrial Ecosystem Research Network (TERN). I.H.H. acknowledges the support of the NSW Department of Primary Industries and the Australian Government Department of Agriculture, Fisheries and Forestry Australia (specifically Dr. G. Laughlin formerly with the Bureau of Rural Sciences). M.L.R. acknowledges the support of the Australian Research Council (CE11E0098). Flux tower data were partly funded by the Australian Research Council projects (DP130101566, LP0990038, DP0772981, DP0451247 and DP0344744). Additional support for collection and archiving was provided through the Australia Terrestrial Ecosystem Research Network (TERN) (http://www.tern.org.au). J.B. is funded under an Australian Research Council Future Fellowship (FT1110602). E.v.G. is supported by the Australian Climate Change Science Program.