Journal article

The impact of whole-of-diet interventions on depression and anxiety: a systematic review of randomised controlled trials

Rachelle S Opie, Adrienne O'Neil, Catherine Itsiopoulos, Felice N Jacka

Public Health Nutrition | CAMBRIDGE UNIV PRESS | Published : 2015

Abstract

OBJECTIVE: Non-pharmacological approaches to the treatment of depression and anxiety are of increasing importance, with emerging evidence supporting a role for lifestyle factors in the development of these disorders. Observational evidence supports a relationship between habitual diet quality and depression. Less is known about the causative effects of diet on mental health outcomes. Therefore a systematic review was undertaken of randomised controlled trials of dietary interventions that used depression and/or anxiety outcomes and sought to identify characteristics of programme success. DESIGN: A systematic search of the Cochrane, MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, PubMed and PyscInfo databases was c..

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Grants

Awarded by National Health and Medical Research Council (NHMRC)


Funding Acknowledgements

Financial support: R.S.O. is currently supported by a PhD scholarship from La Trobe University and Deakin University. A.O. is a recipient of a National Health and Medical Research Council (NHMRC) Postdoctoral Training Fellowship (#1052865). F.N.J. has received Grant/Research support from the Brain and Behaviour Research Institute, the NHMRC; Australian Rotary Health; the Geelong Medical Research Foundation; the Ian Potter Foundation; Eli Lilly; and The University of Melbourne. F.N.J. has been a paid speaker for Sanofi-Synthelabo; Janssen Cilag; Servier; Pfizer; Health Ed; Network Nutrition; Angelini Farmaceutica; and Eli Lilly. F.N.J., C.I. and A.O. have received funding from Meat and Livestock Australia. These funding sources had no role in the design, analysis or writing of this article.