Journal article

Mismatch between Perceived and Objectively Measured Land Use Mix and Street Connectivity: Associations with Neighborhood Walking

Mohammad Javad Koohsari, Hannah Badland, Takemi Sugiyama, Suzanne Mavoa, Hayley Christian, Billie Giles-Corti

JOURNAL OF URBAN HEALTH-BULLETIN OF THE NEW YORK ACADEMY OF MEDICINE | SPRINGER | Published : 2015

Abstract

Studies on the mismatch between objective and perceived measures of walkability and walking provide insights into targeting interventions. These studies focused on those living in more walkable environments, but perceiving them as less walkable. However, it is equally important to understand how the other mismatch (living in less walkable areas, but perceiving them as walkable) is related to walking. This study examined how the mismatch between perceived and objective walkability measures (i.e., living in less walkable areas, but perceiving them as walkable, and living in more walkable areas, but perceiving them as less walkable) was associated with walking. Baseline data from adult particip..

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Grants

Awarded by Western Australian Health Promotion Foundation (Healthway)


Awarded by Australian Research Council


Awarded by Australian National Health and Medical Research Council (NHMRC) Capacity Building


Awarded by National Health and Medical Research Council (NHMRC) Program Grant


Awarded by NHMRC


Awarded by NHMRC Centre of Research Excellence in Healthy Liveability Communities


Awarded by Australian Prevention Partnership Centre


Awarded by NHMRC/National Heart Foundation Early Career Fellowship


Funding Acknowledgements

The RESIDE study was funded by the Western Australian Health Promotion Foundation (Healthway; grant 11828), the Australian Research Council (grant LP0455453), and the Australian National Health and Medical Research Council (NHMRC) Capacity Building (grant 458688). The Department of Planning and the Department of Transport (formerly Department for Planning and Infrastructure), the Western Australian Planning Commission, the Western Australian Land Information Authority (2003), Sensis Pty Ltd, National Heart Foundation and Petcare Information and Advisory Service provided funding to support PhD scholarships and in-kind support for the project. Jacinta Francis, Claire Lauritsen, and Roseanne Barnes coordinated data collection, and Kimberly Van Niel, Bryan Boruff, Bridget Beesley, and Sharyn Hickey assisted with the conceptualization and development of the Geographic Information System measures. MJK is supported by a National Health and Medical Research Council (NHMRC) Program Grant (#569940) and a Victorian Government's Operational Infrastructure Support Program, BGC is supported by an NHMRC Principal Research Fellow Award (#1004900), HB is supported by the NHMRC Centre of Research Excellence in Healthy Liveability Communities (#1061404), and SM by The Australian Prevention Partnership Centre (#9100001) and VicHealth through Community Indicators Victoria. HC is supported by a NHMRC/National Heart Foundation Early Career Fellowship (#1036350).