Journal article

The impact of neuropsychological functioning and coping style on perceived stress in individuals with first-episode psychosis and healthy controls

Kelly A Allott, Marta Rapado-Castro, Tina-Marie Proffitt, Sarah Bendall, Belinda Garner, Felicity Butselaar, Connie Markulev, Christina Phassouliotis, Patrick D McGorry, Stephen J Wood, Susan M Cotton, Lisa J Phillips

PSYCHIATRY RESEARCH | ELSEVIER IRELAND LTD | Published : 2015

Abstract

Stress is implicated in the development and course of psychotic illness, but the factors that influence stress levels are not well understood. The aim of this study was to examine the impact of neuropsychological functioning and coping styles on perceived stress in people with first-episode psychosis (FEP) and healthy controls (HC). Thirty-four minimally treated FEP patients from the Early Psychosis Prevention and Intervention Centre, Melbourne, Australia, and 26 HC participants from a similar demographic area participated in the study. Participants completed a comprehensive neuropsychological test battery as well as the Coping Inventory for Stressful Situations (task-, emotion- and avoidanc..

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Grants

Awarded by National Health and Medical Research Council of Australia


Awarded by Spanish Ministry of Economy and Competitiveness


Awarded by Alicia Koplowitz Foundation (Madrid, Spain)


Funding Acknowledgements

This work was supported by the Colonial Foundation, Orygen Youth Health Research Centre, a postdoctoral clinical research fellowship from the National Health and Medical Research Council of Australia (#628884), a Sara Borrell Health Research Fellowship from the Institute of Health Carlos III, Spanish Ministry of Economy and Competitiveness (Grant no. S2010/BMD-2422 AGES), an Alicia Koplowitz Research Grant, and a Short-Term Fellowship from the Alicia Koplowitz Foundation (Madrid, Spain) (Grant nos. FAK202 and FAK2013).