Journal article

Evaluation of models predicting insignificant prostate cancer to select men for active surveillance of prostate cancer

L-M Wong, DE Neal, A Finelli, S Davis, C Bonner, J Kapoor, J Trachtenberg, B Thomas, CM Hovens, AJ Costello, NM Corcoran

PROSTATE CANCER AND PROSTATIC DISEASES | NATURE PUBLISHING GROUP | Published : 2015

Abstract

BACKGROUND: In an era of personalized medicine, individualized risk assessment using easily available tools on the internet and the literature are appealing. However, uninformed use by clinicians and the public raises potential problems. Herein, we assess the performance of published models to predict insignificant prostate cancer (PCa), using a multi-national low-risk population that may be considered for active surveillance (AS) based on contemporary practice. METHODS: Data on men suitable for AS but undergoing upfront radical prostatectomy were pooled from three international academic institutions in Cambridge (UK), Toronto (Canada) and Melbourne (Australia). Four predictive models identi..

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Grants

Awarded by National Cancer Research Prostate Cancer: Mechanisms of Progression and Treatment (PROMPT) collaborative


Funding Acknowledgements

Princess Margaret Hospital Prostate Centre database was conceived and maintained by the very generous financial and support of the Weinbaum Family Foundation with administrative support by the Princess Margaret Cancer Centre Foundation. We acknowledge the support of The University of Cambridge, Cancer Research UK and Hutchison Whampoa Limited. We acknowledge the support of the National Institute for Health Research, which funds the Cambridge Biomedical Research Centre, Cambridge, UK. We also acknowledge the support of the National Cancer Research Prostate Cancer: Mechanisms of Progression and Treatment (PROMPT) collaborative (grant code G0500966/75466), which has funded tissue and urine collections in Cambridge. We also acknowledge the support of the Cambridge Cancer Research Foundation. The Human Research Tissue Bank is supported by the NIHR Cambridge Biomedical Research Centre.