Journal article

Analysis of early nephron patterning reveals a role for distal RV proliferation in fusion to the ureteric tip via a cap mesenchyme-derived connecting segment

Kylie Georgas, Bree Rumballe, M Todd Valerius, Han Sheng Chiu, Rathi D Thiagarajan, Ernmanuelle Lesieur, Bruce J Aronow, Eric W Brunskill, Alexander N Combes, Dave Tang, Darrin Taylor, Sean M Grimmond, S Steven Potter, Andrew P McMahon, Melissa H Little

DEVELOPMENTAL BIOLOGY | ACADEMIC PRESS INC ELSEVIER SCIENCE | Published : 2009

Abstract

While nephron formation is known to be initiated by a mesenchyme-to-epithelial transition of the cap mesenchyme to form a renal vesicle (RV), the subsequent patterning of the nephron and fusion with the ureteric component of the kidney to form a patent contiguous uriniferous tubule has not been fully characterized. Using dual section in situ hybridization (SISH)/immunohistochemistry (IHC) we have revealed distinct distal/proximal patterning of Notch, BMP and Wnt pathway components within the RV stage nephron. Quantitation of mitoses and Cyclin D1 expression indicated that cell proliferation was higher in the distal RV, reflecting the differential developmental programs of the proximal and di..

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Grants

Awarded by National Institutes of Health-NIDDK


Awarded by National Research Service Award (NRSA)


Awarded by NATIONAL INSTITUTE OF DIABETES AND DIGESTIVE AND KIDNEY DISEASES


Funding Acknowledgements

We wish to thank Jane Brennan, Jane Armstrong, Sue Lloyd-McGilp, Chris Armit and Jamie A. Davies (Edinburgh University, Scotland) and Derek Houghton, Ying Cheng, Xingjun Pi, Mehran Sharghi, Simon Harding and Duncan R. Davidson (MRC Human Genetics Unit, Western General Hospital, Scotland) within the Editorial and Database Development Offices of GUDMAP respectively for their support and assistance in annotating and uploading data to the GUDMAP database http://www.gudmap.org, which is supported by the NIH-NIDDK. Confocal microscopy was performed at the ACRF/IMB Dynamic Imaging Centre for Cancer Biology, established with the support of the Australian Cancer Research Foundation. The work presented in this manuscript was supported by the National Institutes of Health-NIDDK research grants to M.H.L and S.G - DK070136, S.S.P - DK070251 and A.RM - R37 DK054364. M.T.V. was supported by a National Research Service Award (NRSA) (NIH-NIDDK F32DK060319). S.G and M.H.L are Research Fellows of the National Health and Medical Research Council of Australia.