Journal article

Suspicious minds: Can features of the local neighbourhood ease parents' fears about stranger danger?

Sarah Foster, Lisa Wood, Jacinta Francis, Matthew Knuiman, Karen Villanueva, Billie Giles-Corti

JOURNAL OF ENVIRONMENTAL PSYCHOLOGY | ACADEMIC PRESS LTD- ELSEVIER SCIENCE LTD | Published : 2015

Abstract

Declines in children's independent mobility are frequently attributed to parents' fears about stranger danger, yet there is limited understanding of the factors that might aggravate (or ease) these concerns. We examined the social and built environment correlates of parents': (1) fears about strangers harming their child; and (2) perceptions of the likelihood this would actually happen. We also tested whether associations differed by area socio-economic status (SES) as parents in low income neighbourhoods, typically with more crime, may hold greater fears for their children's safety. Results suggest that regardless of SES, neighbourhood features that encouraged pedestrians, whilst minimising..

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Grants

Awarded by Western Australian Health Promotion Foundation (Healthway)


Awarded by National Health and Medical Research Council


Awarded by Healthway Health Promotion Research Fellowships


Awarded by NHMRC Principal Research Fellow Award


Funding Acknowledgements

This study was supported by the Western Australian Health Promotion Foundation (Healthway) (#24002) and The National Health and Medical Research Council (#403933). SF and LW are supported by Healthway Health Promotion Research Fellowships (#21363 and #20693, respectively), and BGC by a NHMRC Principal Research Fellow Award (#1004900). The Western Australian Land Information Authority ((c) 2003), Western Australian Department of Planning provided the spatial data, and crime locations were supplied courtesy of the Western Australia Police.