Journal article

Limits on low-frequency radio emission from southern exoplanets with the Murchison Widefield Array

Tara Murphy, Martin E Bell, David L Kaplan, BM Gaensler, Andre R Offringa, Emil Lenc, Natasha Hurley-Walker, G Bernardi, JD Bowman, F Briggs, RJ Cappallo, BE Corey, AA Deshpande, D Emrich, R Goeke, LJ Greenhill, BJ Hazelton, JN Hewitt, M Johnston-Hollitt, JC Kasper Show all

MONTHLY NOTICES OF THE ROYAL ASTRONOMICAL SOCIETY | OXFORD UNIV PRESS | Published : 2015

Abstract

We present the results of a survey for low-frequency radio emission from 17 known exoplanetary systems with the Murchison Widefield Array. This sample includes 13 systems that have not previously been targeted with radio observations. We detected no radio emission at 154 MHz, and put 3τ upper limits in the range 15.2-112.5 mJy on this emission. We also searched for circularly polarized emission and made no detections, obtaining 3τ upper limits in the range 3.4-49.9 mJy. These are comparable with the best low-frequency radio limits in the existing literature and translate to luminosity limits of between 1.2 × 1014 and 1.4 × 1017 Wif the emission is assumed to be 100 per cent circularly polari..

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University of Melbourne Researchers

Grants

Awarded by US National Science Foundation


Awarded by Australian Research Council


Awarded by US Air Force Office of Scientific Research


Awarded by Centre for All-sky Astrophysics (an Australian Research Council Centre of Excellence)


Awarded by Victoria University of Wellington from the New Zealand Ministry of Economic Development


Awarded by Victoria University of Wellington from IBM Shared University Research Grant


Awarded by Direct For Mathematical & Physical Scien


Funding Acknowledgements

We thank Elaine Sadler for useful discussions and Aina Musaeva for assistance with the data reduction. This scientific work makes use of the Murchison Radio-astronomy Observatory, operated by Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation (CSIRO). We acknowledge the Wajarri Yamatji people as the traditional owners of the Observatory site. Support for the MWA comes from the US National Science Foundation (grants AST-0457585, PHY-0835713, CAREER-0847753 and AST-0908884), the Australian Research Council (LIEF grants LE0775621 and LE0882938), the US Air Force Office of Scientific Research (grant FA9550-0510247) and the Centre for All-sky Astrophysics (an Australian Research Council Centre of Excellence funded by grant CE110001020). Support is also provided by the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory, the MIT School of Science, the Raman Research Institute, the Australian National University, and the Victoria University of Wellington (via grant MED-E1799 from the New Zealand Ministry of Economic Development and an IBM Shared University Research Grant). The Australian Federal government provides additional support via the CSIRO, National Collaborative Research Infrastructure Strategy, Education Investment Fund, and the Australia India Strategic Research Fund, and Astronomy Australia Limited, under contract to Curtin University. We acknowledge the iVEC Petabyte Data Store, the Initiative in Innovative Computing and the CUDA Center for Excellence sponsored by NVIDIA at Harvard University, and the International Centre for Radio Astronomy Research (ICRAR), a Joint Venture of Curtin University and The University of Western Australia, funded by the Western Australian State government.