Journal article

Problem gambling and internalising symptoms: A longitudinal analysis of common and specific social environmental protective factors

Kirsty E Scholes-Balog, Sheryl A Hemphill, John W Toumbourou, Nicki A Dowling

ADDICTIVE BEHAVIORS | PERGAMON-ELSEVIER SCIENCE LTD | Published : 2015

Abstract

INTRODUCTION: Comorbidity between problem gambling and internalising disorders (anxiety and depression) has long been recognised. However, it is not clear how these relationships develop, and what factors can foster resilience to both conditions. The current study draws on longitudinal cohort data to investigate: 1) the cross-sectional and longitudinal relationships between problem gambling and internalising symptoms; 2) whether there are common and/or specific social environmental factors protective against both internalising symptoms and problem gambling in young adulthood; and 3) interactive protective factors (i.e., those that moderate the relationship between problem gambling and intern..

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Grants

Awarded by National Institute on Drug Abuse


Awarded by Australian Research Council


Awarded by Australian National Health and Medical Research Council


Awarded by NATIONAL INSTITUTE ON DRUG ABUSE


Funding Acknowledgements

The authors are grateful for the financial support of the National Institute on Drug Abuse (R01-DA012140) for the International Youth Development Study initial data collection. Continued data collection in Victoria, Australia has been supported by three Australian Research Council Discovery Projects (DPO663371, DPO877359, and DP1095744) and an Australian National Health and Medical Research Council grant (project number, 594793). The analyses presented here were supported by funding from the Victorian Responsible Gambling Foundation Grants for Gambling Research Program. The content is solely the responsibility of the authors and does not necessarily represent the official views of the National Institute on Drug Abuse, the National Institutes of Health or Australian funders. None of the funders had any role in the study design, collection, analysis or interpretation of data, writing the manuscript, or the decision to submit the paper for publication.