Journal article

A surface-bound molecule that undergoes optically biased Brownian rotation

James A Hutchison, Hiroshi Uji-i, Ania Deres, Tom Vosch, Susana Rocha, Sibylle Mueller, Andreas A Bastian, Joerg Enderlein, Hassan Nourouzi, Chen Li, Andreas Herrmann, Klaus Muellen, Frans De Schryver, Johan Hofkens

Nature Nanotechnology | NATURE PUBLISHING GROUP | Published : 2014

Abstract

Developing molecular systems with functions analogous to those of macroscopic machine components, such as rotors, gyroscopes and valves, is a long-standing goal of nanotechnology. However, macroscopic analogies go only so far in predicting function in nanoscale environments, where friction dominates over inertia. In some instances, ratchet mechanisms have been used to bias the ever-present random, thermally driven (Brownian) motion and drive molecular diffusion in desired directions. Here, we visualize the motions of surface-bound molecular rotors using defocused fluorescence imaging, and observe the transition from hindered to free Brownian rotation by tuning medium viscosity. We show that ..

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University of Melbourne Researchers

Grants

Awarded by European Research Council under the European Union


Awarded by Flemish government


Awarded by 'Fonds voor Wetenschapplijk Onderzoek Vlaanderen' (FWO)


Awarded by Hercules Foundation


Awarded by Federal Science Policy of Belgium


Awarded by UNIK research initiative of the Danish Ministry of Science, Technology and Innovation


Funding Acknowledgements

The research leading to these results received funding from the European Research Council under the European Union's Seventh Framework Programme (FP7/2007-2013/ERC grant agreement 291593 FLUOROCODE), from the Flemish government in the form of a long-term structural funding 'Methusalem' grant (METH/08/04 CASAS), from the 'Fonds voor Wetenschapplijk Onderzoek Vlaanderen' (FWO grants G0413.10, G0697.11 and G0197.11), from the Hercules Foundation (HER/08/021) and from the Federal Science Policy of Belgium (IAP-PAIP7/05 'Functional Supramolecular Systems') and the UNIK research initiative of the Danish Ministry of Science, Technology and Innovation (grant 09-065274).