Journal article

Patterns of Hepatitis C Virus RNA Levels during Acute Infection: The InC3 Study

Behzad Hajarizadeh, Bart Grady, Kimberly Page, Arthur Y Kim, Barbara H McGovern, Andrea L Cox, Thomas M Rice, Rachel Sacks-Davis, Julie Bruneau, Meghan Morris, Janaki Amin, Janke Schinkel, Tanya Applegate, Lisa Maher, Margaret Hellard, Andrew R Lloyd, Maria Prins, Gregory J Dore, Jason Grebely

PLOS ONE | PUBLIC LIBRARY SCIENCE | Published : 2015

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Understanding the patterns of HCV RNA levels during acute hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection provides insights into immunopathogenesis and is important for vaccine design. This study evaluated patterns of HCV RNA levels and associated factors among individuals with acute infection. METHODS: Data were from an international collaboration of nine prospective cohorts of acute HCV (InC3 Study). Participants with well-characterized acute HCV infection (detected within three months post-infection and interval between the peak and subsequent HCV RNA levels ≤ 120 days) were categorised by a priori-defined patterns of HCV RNA levels: i) spontaneous clearance, ii) partial viral control with ..

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Awarded by National Institute on Drug Abuse Award


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Awarded by NIH


Awarded by NHMRC Project


Awarded by Alberta Innovates


Awarded by NATIONAL INSTITUTE OF ALLERGY AND INFECTIOUS DISEASES


Awarded by NATIONAL INSTITUTE OF DIABETES AND DIGESTIVE AND KIDNEY DISEASES


Awarded by NATIONAL INSTITUTE ON DRUG ABUSE


Funding Acknowledgements

The InC<INF>3</INF> Study is supported by the National Institute on Drug Abuse Award Number R01DA031056. The Kirby Institute is funded by the Australian Government Department of Health and Ageing. BH is supported by an Australian Postgraduate PhD Award. JG is supported by a National Health and Medical Research Council (NHMRC) Career Development Fellowship. GD and AL are supported by NHMRC Practitioner Research Fellowships. MH and LM are supported by NHMRC Senior Research Fellowships and MH additionally by a VicHealth Senior Research Fellowship. RSD was supported by an NHMRC postgraduate scholarship and a Centre for Research Excellence into Injecting Drug Use postgraduate top-up scholarship. ATAHC is supported by National Institutes of Health grant number: RO1 DA 15999-01. Other research support includes NIH U19 AI088791 (AC), NIH U19 AI066345 (AK, BM), R01 DA033541 (AK), MOP-103138, MOP-210232 (JB), the Netherlands National Institute for Public Health and the Environment (MP), and NHMRC Project Grant #630483 (LM). BM received funding in the form of salary from the commercial company Abbvie. The funders had no role in study design, data collection and analysis, decision to publish, or preparation of the manuscript.