Journal article

Restricting access to invasion hubs enables sustained control of an invasive vertebrate

Mike Letnic, Jonathan K Webb, Tim S Jessop, Tim Dempster

JOURNAL OF APPLIED ECOLOGY | WILEY | Published : 2015

Abstract

Biological invasions often occur through expansion of satellite populations that become established at ‘invasion hubs’. Invasion hubs can result from random dispersal events, but frequently arise when invading individuals actively choose habitats using cues that signify high‐quality environments where the fitness consequences are positive. Theoretical studies suggest that targeted control at invasion hubs can effectively suppress the populations and impacts of invaders. In arid Australia, small dams that provide water for livestock function as invasion hubs by providing an invasive vertebrate, the cane toad Rhinella marina, with refuge from extreme aridity during the annual dry season. Toads..

View full abstract

University of Melbourne Researchers

Grants

Funding Acknowledgements

We thank the Hermon Slade Foundation, Daniel Florence, Alex Worthing, Mick Tasker and Ben Wratten from Australian Agricultural Company, Graeme Sawyer and Kim Hands for their support. Ethics approval was provided by the University of Sydney Animal Ethics Committee protocol L04/9-2009/3/5132.