Journal article

Cracking the nodule worm code advances knowledge of parasite biology and biotechnology to tackle major diseases of livestock

Rahul Tyagi, Anja Joachim, Baerbel Ruttkowski, Bruce A Rosa, John C Martin, Kymberlie Hallsworth-Pepin, Xu Zhang, Philip Ozersky, Richard K Wilson, Shoba Ranganathan, Paul W Sternberg, Robin B Gasser, Makedonka Mitreva

BIOTECHNOLOGY ADVANCES | PERGAMON-ELSEVIER SCIENCE LTD | Published : 2015

Abstract

Many infectious diseases caused by eukaryotic pathogens have a devastating, long-term impact on animal health and welfare. Hundreds of millions of animals are affected by parasitic nematodes of the order Strongylida. Unlocking the molecular biology of representatives of this order, and understanding nematode-host interactions, drug resistance and disease using advanced technologies could lead to entirely new ways of controlling the diseases that they cause. Oesophagostomum dentatum (nodule worm; superfamily Strongyloidea) is an economically important strongylid nematode parasite of swine worldwide. The present article reports recent advances made in biology and animal biotechnology through t..

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University of Melbourne Researchers

Grants

Awarded by US National Institutes of Health


Awarded by Victorian Life Sciences Computation Initiative



Awarded by NATIONAL HUMAN GENOME RESEARCH INSTITUTE


Awarded by NATIONAL INSTITUTE OF ALLERGY AND INFECTIOUS DISEASES


Awarded by NATIONAL INSTITUTE OF GENERAL MEDICAL SCIENCES


Funding Acknowledgements

The authors thank the faculty and staff of the Genome Institute at Washington University who contributed the work described in this article. The genome sequencing and annotation work was funded by US National Institutes of Health grant U54HG003079 to R.K.W. Comparative genome analysis was funded by grants AI081803 and GM097435 to M.M. P.W.S. is an investigator with the Howard Hughes Medical Institute. RBG's research was supported by the Australian Research Council (SRC), the National Health & Medical Research Council of Australia (NHMRC) and the Victorian Life Sciences Computation Initiative (VR0007).