Journal article

Construct Validity and Minimal Important Difference of 6-Minute Walk Distance in Survivors of Acute Respiratory Failure

Kitty S Chan, Elizabeth R Pfoh, Linda Denehy, Doug Elliott, Anne E Holland, Victor D Dinglas, Dale M Needham

CHEST | AMER COLL CHEST PHYSICIANS | Published : 2015

Abstract

OBJECTIVE: The 6-min walk distance (6MWD), a widely used test of functional capacity, has limited evidence of construct validity among patients surviving acute respiratory failure (ARF) and ARDS. The objective of this study was to examine construct validity and responsiveness and estimate minimal important difference (MID) for the 6MWD in patients surviving ARF/ARDS. METHODS: For this secondary data analysis of four international studies of adult patients surviving ARF/ARDS (N = 641), convergent and discriminant validity, known group validity, predictive validity, and responsiveness were assessed. MID was examined using anchor- and distribution-based approaches. Analyses were performed withi..

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University of Melbourne Researchers

Grants

Awarded by National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute


Awarded by Johns Hopkins Institute for Clinical and Translational Research


Awarded by Omega-3 Fatty Acid/Antioxidant


Awarded by Australian National Health and Medical Research Council (NHMRC)


Awarded by NHMRC


Awarded by NATIONAL CENTER FOR ADVANCING TRANSLATIONAL SCIENCES


Awarded by NATIONAL HEART, LUNG, AND BLOOD INSTITUTE


Funding Acknowledgements

This research was supported by the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute [R24HL111895, R01HL091760, R01HL091760-02S1, R01HL096504, and P050HL7399], the Johns Hopkins Institute for Clinical and Translational Research [UL1TR000424-06], the Albuterol to Treat Acute Lung Injury (ALTA), the Early vs Delayed Enteral Feeding to Treat People With Acute Lung Injury or Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome (EDEN), and the Omega-3 Fatty Acid/Antioxidant Supplementation for Treating People With Acute Lung Injury or Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome (OMEGA) trials [contracts for sites participating in this study: HSN268200536170C, HHSN268200536171C, HHSN268200536173C, HHSN268200536174C, HSN268200536175C, and HHSN268200536179C]. The Elliott trial was supported by the Australian National Health and Medical Research Council (NHMRC) [Grant 352407]. The Denehy trial was completed with funds from the NHMRC [Grant 454717], the Physiotherapy Research Foundation, the Austin Hospital Medical Research Foundation, and the Australian and New Zealand Intensive Care Society.