Journal article

Who Purchases Low-Cost Alcohol in Australia?

Sarah Callinan, Robin Room, Michael Livingston, Heng Jiang

ALCOHOL AND ALCOHOLISM | OXFORD UNIV PRESS | Published : 2015

Abstract

AIMS: Debates surrounding potential price-based polices aimed at reducing alcohol-related harms tend to focus on the debate concerning who would be most affected-harmful or low-income drinkers. This study will investigate the characteristics of people who purchase low-cost alcohol using data from the Australian arm of the International Alcohol Control study. METHODS: 1681 Australians aged 16 and over who had consumed alcohol and purchased it in off-licence premises were asked detailed questions about both practices. Low-cost alcohol was defined using cut-points of 80¢, $1.00 or $1.25 per Australian standard drink. RESULTS: With a $1.00 cut-off low income (OR = 2.1) and heavy drin..

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Grants

Awarded by Australian National Preventive Health Agency (ANPHA)


Funding Acknowledgements

The data used in this paper are from the Australian arm of the International Alcohol Control Study (IAC), led by Professor Sally Casswell. The IAC core survey questionnaire was largely developed by researchers at SHORE & Whariki Research Centre, College of Health, Massey University, New Zealand, with funding from the Health Promotion Agency, New Zealand. Further development involved collaboration between UK, Thai, Korean and New Zealand researchers. The funding source for the data set used in this article is the Australian National Preventive Health Agency (ANPHA; grant ref 157ROO2011). The contents of this paper are solely the responsibility of the authors and do not reflect the views of ANPHA. S.C. and H.J.'s time on this study was funded by the Foundation for Alcohol Research and Education, an independent, charitable organisation working to prevent the harmful use of alcohol in Australia: www.fare.org.au. M.L. is the recipient of an NHMRC Early Career Fellowship and R.R.'s position is largely funded by the Victorian Department of Health. The authors would like to thank Kim Bloomfield for her thoughtful comments on an earlier version of this paper.