Journal article

Lucilia cuprina genome unlocks parasitic fly biology to underpin future interventions

Clare A Anstead, Pasi K Korhonen, Neil D Young, Ross S Hall, Aaron R Jex, Shwetha C Murali, Daniel ST Hughes, Siu F Lee, Trent Perry, Andreas J Stroehlein, Brendan RE Ansell, Bert Breugelmans, Andreas Hofmann, Jiaxin Qu, Shannon Dugan, Sandra L Lee, Hsu Chao, Huyen Dinh, Yi Han, Harsha V Doddapaneni Show all

NATURE COMMUNICATIONS | NATURE PUBLISHING GROUP | Published : 2015

Abstract

Lucilia cuprina is a parasitic fly of major economic importance worldwide. Larvae of this fly invade their animal host, feed on tissues and excretions and progressively cause severe skin disease (myiasis). Here we report the sequence and annotation of the 458-megabase draft genome of Lucilia cuprina. Analyses of this genome and the 14,544 predicted protein-encoding genes provide unique insights into the fly's molecular biology, interactions with the host animal and insecticide resistance. These insights have broad implications for designing new methods for the prevention and control of myiasis.

Grants

Awarded by National Human Genome Research Institute (NHGRI)


Awarded by Victorian Life Sciences Computation Initiative (VLSCI) on its Peak Computing Facility at the University of Melbourne, an initiative of the Victorian Government


Awarded by Marie Curie International Outgoing Fellowship


Awarded by Swiss National Science Foundation (SNF)


Awarded by NATIONAL HUMAN GENOME RESEARCH INSTITUTE


Funding Acknowledgements

Funding from Australian Wool Innovation (to P.B. and R.B.G.) and the Australian Research Council (to R.B.G.) is gratefully acknowledged. Support to R.B.G.'s laboratory by YourGene Bioscience and Melbourne Water Corporation is gratefully acknowledged. We thank the staff at the Baylor College of Medicine Human Genome Sequencing Center for their contributions. Genome sequencing and assembly was funded by a grant U54 HG003273 from the National Human Genome Research Institute (NHGRI to R.A.G.). This project was also supported by a Victorian Life Sciences Computation Initiative (VLSCI; grant number VR0007) on its Peak Computing Facility at the University of Melbourne, an initiative of the Victorian Government (R.B.G.). C.A.A. holds an NSERC Postdoctoral Fellowship. N.D.Y. holds an NHMRC Early Career Research Fellowship. P.K.K. is the recipient of a scholarship (STRAPA) from the University of Melbourne. R.M.W. holds a Marie Curie International Outgoing Fellowship PIOF-GA-2011-303312. P.I. holds a Swiss National Science Foundation (SNF) Award 31003A-143936 (to E.M.Z.) We would specifically like to acknowledge all scientists who developed programmes used in this study. Given the restriction on the number of papers that could be cited in this article, we were not able to include all original publications. Instead, we have included links to respective websites. We would also like to thank Q. Lang for the use of his L. cuprina image.