Journal article

Effects of oxytocin and genetic variants on brain and behaviour: Implications for treatment in schizophrenia

Cali F Bartholomeusz, Eleni P Ganella, Izelle Labuschagne, Chad Bousman, Christos Pantelis

SCHIZOPHRENIA RESEARCH | ELSEVIER SCIENCE BV | Published : 2015

Abstract

Impairments in social cognition and poor social functioning are core features of schizophrenia-spectrum disorders. In recent years, there has been a move towards developing new treatment strategies that specifically target social cognitive and social behavioural deficits. Oxytocin (OXT) is one such strategy that has gained increasing attention. There is a strong rationale for studying OXT in psychosis, from both an evolutionary perspective and neurodevelopmental-cognitive model of schizophrenia. Thus, the aim of this review was to critique and examine the observational and clinical oxytocin trial literature in schizophrenia-spectrum disorders. A handful of clinical trials suggest that OXT tr..

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Grants

Awarded by NHMRC


Awarded by NARSAD


Funding Acknowledgements

Dr Bartholomeusz was supported by a University of Melbourne, Department of Psychiatry, John and Betty Lynch Fellowship. Ms Ganella was supported by a University of Melbourne, Faculty of Medicine, Dentistry and Health Sciences, Ronald John Gleghorn PhD Scholarship and a Co-operative Research Centre PhD top-up Scholarship. Dr Bousman was supported by a University of Melbourne, Faculty of Medicine, Dentistry and Health Sciences, Ronald Phillip Griffith Fellowship. Prof Pantelis was supported by a NHMRC Senior Principal Research Fellowship (ID: 628386), NHMRC Program Grants (ID: 350241; 566529) and a NARSAD Distinguished Investigator Award (ID: 18722).