Journal article

Mechanisms Underlying Neurocognitive Dysfunctions in Recurrent Major Depression

Piotr Galecki, Monika Talarowska, George Anderson, Michael Berk, Michael Maes

MEDICAL SCIENCE MONITOR | INT SCIENTIFIC LITERATURE, INC | Published : 2015

Abstract

Recent work shows that depression is intimately associated with changes in cognitive functioning, including memory, attention, verbal fluency, and other aspects of higher-order cognitive processing. Changes in cognitive functioning are more likely to occur when depressive episodes are recurrent and to abate to some degree during periods of remission. However, with accumulating frequency and duration of depressive episodes, cognitive deficits can become enduring, being evident even when mood improves. Such changes in cognitive functioning give depression links to mild cognitive impairment and thereby with neurodegenerative conditions, including Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, schizo..

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University of Melbourne Researchers

Grants

Awarded by NHMRC Senior Principal Research Fellowship


Awarded by National Science Centre


Funding Acknowledgements

Michael Berk is supported by a NHMRC Senior Principal Research Fellowship 1059660. Michael Maes is supported by a CNPq (Conselho Nacional de Desenvolvimento Cientifico e Technologia) PVE fellowship and the Health Sciences Graduate Program fellowship, Londrina State University (UEL). Piotr Galecki, Monika Talarowska - this study was supported with scientific research grants from the National Science Centre (no. 2011/01/D/HS6/05484 and no. 2012/05/B/NZ5/01452)