Journal article

Hyperfiltration in Indigenous Australians with and without diabetes

Elif I Ekinci, Jaquelyne T Hughes, Mark D Chatfield, Paul D Lawton, Graham RD Jones, Andrew G Ellis, Alan Cass, Mark Thomas, Richard J MacIsaac, Kerin O'Dea, George Jerums, Louise J Maple-Brown

NEPHROLOGY DIALYSIS TRANSPLANTATION | OXFORD UNIV PRESS | Published : 2015

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Hyperfiltration (HF) has been linked to the development of diabetic kidney disease (DKD), but the causative or predictive role of HF in the pathogenesis of DKD still remains unclear. To date, there have been no studies of HF in Indigenous Australians, a population with high rates of both diabetes and end-stage kidney disease. We aimed to compare the characteristics and frequency of HF in Indigenous Australians with and without type 2 diabetes. METHODS: Indigenous Australian participants, recruited across five pre-defined strata of health, diabetes status and kidney function, had a reference glomerular filtration rate (GFR) measured using plasma disappearance of iohexol [measured ..

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Grants

Awarded by National Health and Medical Research Council of Australia (NHMRC)


Awarded by NHMRC


Awarded by Australian NHMRC Early Career Fellowship in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Research


Awarded by NHMRC Australia


Funding Acknowledgements

The eGFR study was funded by the National Health and Medical Research Council of Australia (NHMRC, Project Grant 545202). The views expressed are those of the authors and do not reflect the views of NHMRC. Additional support was obtained from Kidney Health Australia, NHMRC 320860, the Colonial Foundation, Diabetes Australia Research Trust, Rebecca L Cooper Foundation and SeaSwift, Thursday Island. L.M.B. is supported by an Australian NHMRC Early Career Fellowship in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Research (605837). E.I.E. is supported by an NHMRC Early Career Fellowship: Health Professional Research Fellowship (part time, 1054312). J.H. is supported by NHMRC Scholarship 490348, Rio Tinto Aboriginal Fund and the Centre of Clinical Research Excellence in Clinical Science of Diabetes, University of Melbourne. P.L. is supported by NHMRC Scholarship 1038529. A.C. holds a NHMRC Principal Research Fellowship 1027204, and W.E.H. holds an NHMRC Australia Fellowship 511081. Funding bodies had no role in the study design; in the collection, analysis or interpretation of data; in the writing of the manuscript or the decision to submit the manuscript for publication.