Journal article

Neurocognitive and social cognitive predictors of cannabis use in first-episode psychosis

Chelsea Arnold, Kelly Allott, John Farhall, Eoin Killackey, Sue Cotton

Schizophrenia Research | ELSEVIER | Published : 2015

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Findings are unclear as to whether cannabis use is associated with better cognitive functioning in individuals with psychosis. OBJECTIVES: To elucidate the association between cannabis use, neurocognition and social cognition in first-episode psychosis (FEP). METHODS: Secondary data analysis was conducted on data from 133 FEP participants who had enrolled in a randomized controlled trial of a vocational intervention. Participants completed a neurocognitive and social cognitive battery and characteristics of cannabis use were documented (disorder, recency, frequency and dose). Principal axis factor analysis was used to determine the underlying structure of the cognitive batteries...

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Grants

Awarded by Australian Research Council


Awarded by National Health and Medical Research Council Clinical Research Fellowship


Awarded by National Health and Medical Research Council


Funding Acknowledgements

This work was supported by Australian Rotary Health; the Australian Research Council (LP0883273); Orygen, The National Centre of Excellence in Youth Mental; a National Health and Medical Research Council Clinical Research Fellowship to K.A. (#628884); and University of Melbourne, Faculty of Medicine, Dentistry and Health Sciences Ronald Philip Griffiths Fellowships to E.K., S.C., and K.A. E.K. (APP1051891) and S.C. (1061998) are currently supported by National Health and Medical Research Council Career Development Fellowships.