Journal article

Impact of antiretroviral therapy (ART) timing on chronic immune activation/inflammation and end-organ damage

Reena Rajasuriar, Edwina Wright, Sharon R Lewin

CURRENT OPINION IN HIV AND AIDS | LIPPINCOTT WILLIAMS & WILKINS | Published : 2015

Abstract

PURPOSE OF REVIEW: The purpose of this review was to summarize recent studies on the effect of early antiretroviral therapy (ART) in HIV-infected patients on markers of immune activation/inflammation, viral persistence and serious non-AIDS events. RECENT FINDINGS: Early ART, initiated within days to months of HIV infection, was associated with marked reduction in T-cell activation often reaching levels observed in HIV-uninfected individuals. However, the impact of early ART on markers of innate immune activation, microbial translocation and inflammation/coagulation was less clear. Early ART has also been associated with a significant reduction in the frequency of latently infected cells, whi..

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Grants

Awarded by High Impact Research/Ministry of Higher Education


Awarded by University Malaya Research Grant (UMRG)


Awarded by National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases


Awarded by US National Institutes of Health (Delaney AIDS Research Enterprise, DARE)


Awarded by NATIONAL INSTITUTE OF ALLERGY AND INFECTIOUS DISEASES


Funding Acknowledgements

R.R. receives funding from the High Impact Research/Ministry of Higher Education grant (H-20001-E000001 and H-20001-E000091) and the University Malaya Research Grant (UMRG; RP029-14HTM). E.J.W. is supported by an early career development fellowship from the National Health and Medical Research Council (NHMRC) and by a grant from the National Institute of Mental Health, the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke and the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (1U01-AIO68641). S.R.L. is supported by the National Health and Medical Research Council senior practitioner fellowship and the Division of AIDS, the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Disease, and the US National Institutes of Health (Delaney AIDS Research Enterprise, DARE; U19AI096109).